June 1973

……. ” …. ” …… ” i Vol. 6 No. i0 ,~ June 1973 JUNE CALENDAR OF EVENTS. June 2 Story Hour, Little Falls Library 10:30 am June 5 PTA meeting. 7:30 pm Clara Barton School June 5 and 7 Reluctant Dragon Dittle Falls Libe 4pm June 6 Concert Little Falls …. Libwary 7:30 pm June 6 Transportation Meeting 7:30 pm Lock House I0 June 13 Pressin~ Flowers 3 to 5 pm Little Falls Library June 23 Grand Opening of Glen Echo Park June 25 Summer Recreation Center open i to 4 pm June 25Bookmobile moves to Quick Food Shop 5 to 5:30 pm June 25 to 29 Vacation Bible School C.J. Methodist Church June 26 ~ommunity Swim begins at Palisades Pool. llam-lpm Iiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiili11111 , J01N THE PARADE AT GLEN ECHO Help celebrate the opening day of Glen Echo Parkl Come early – make a banner or a mask or a drum – or whaOever you wishÁ There will be all kinds of exciting materials to use at the”Found Arts Workshop”. The only admission i@ a good imagination The Parade begins at 4 pm. The route is from Glen Echo Parking lot to the Union Bridge along MacArthur Blvd. and back. Everyone is welcome. No age limits – decorate your baby’s stroller. SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL PARADE !!!! *********************************** FOUNDARTS WORKSHOP Open Tues., Wed, and Thurs. from 3 to 5 pm, beginning July 5th till August 29th. No need to register- Just drop inl Cost is 50# per hour per person, 75¢ for two when a child brings his or her parent. A~es: 6 and up – under six with adult. Find new uses for things industries throw away. Work with fascinating pieces of plastic- wood – metals. Linda Schlafman, workshop instructor, has her BA inFine Arts from American University, was anExhibits Specialist at the Smithsonian Institution, and a museum technician in the Conserva- tion Research Laboratory at the Museum of History and Technology. She has taught sculpture and designed and produced exhibits. Now, ~ she teaches Arts and Crafts and Sculpture, 3-6 in the Carderock School PTA after school program. Exhibit what you create in the “Glen Echo Museum of Found Arts” !! THE DRIVE IS ON ….. I,m disappointed that only 5 people have volunteered to collect for the Village News. We certainly won’t reach out goal of ~550 (one dollar from each house) with that little volunteer support. The five volunteers~ however~ are good ones… Diane Heflin for Riverside Drive, Maryanne Wilson for 83rd St, Bill White for Seuen Locks Rd. and Carver Rd.. Minda Wetzel for 76th Place, Cabin Rd. and 76th St., and Kay Kemp for A~dan Rd. If anyone else wants to volun- teer tocollect money, they’re welcome to do so. The drive will be on ~ntil June I0, and I will be collecting money on June 15 from the volunteers. If no one has come to your door by June lO, please mail a check to Mary Anne Wilson P.O. Box 186 Cabin J~hn, Md. 20731, or Susan Vogt 6509 76th St. Cabin John, Md. The Village Newscan’t continue to exist without a dollar from every house in Cabin John. So~ don’t for- get – give your dollar (or morel) or mail your check before June 10. Checks should be made payable to “Cabin John~illage News”. ********************* B~ the wag, I want to personally thank the businesses who advertise in Cabin John. The QuickFood Shop, Dorothy Helen’s Beauty Salon, Emil and Vera Dolezal all contribute advertising money and do us all a public service. The next timeilyou’re in one of these businesses, why don’t you thank thesepeople for helping to supportthe Village News. ************************************* ************************************ FREE SWDo~ COMMENCES Cabin John children are again invited to enjoy the Palisades Pool this summer. Dates are set for Tuesday and Thursday each week, from ll – 1 p.m. Just as last year, each six children must have one adult pres- ent. The first time the child attends the pool in the free swim he must have the following permission or one written by the parent filled out and signed, and he must bring it with him, or he will not be allowed in the pool. I give my child permission to swim in Palisades Swimming Pool, Community Swim, Tuesday and Thursday II – I p.m., and I assume responsibility. (Signature) METHODIST CHURCH NHNS The Cabin John United Methodist Church will sponsor a Vacation Bible School June 25-29. All children in the community are invited. Betty Burchel is chairman and Betty Beck: is co-chairman of the Vacation Bible School. The church will begin a new venture in adult Christian education in September with classes in the following at@as, biblical studies, Christian growth and maturity and Christian responses to cont@mporary issues. Leader Training will be held June 13, 20, and 27 from 7,30-9,00 pore, at the church. A special fellowship evening is being planned for July 15 by Ella Barrett and Betty Peck. It will be called “The Birthday Party.” The church is also forming drama groups to write and produce church plays for this fall. We invite anyone interested in drama to join with us. The pastor, Rev. Wayne Leaver, who recently graduated from Wesley Theological Seminary, is currently doing a Chaplain Internship at Sibley Hospital. He will lead a Hospital Visitation Workshop at the church on July ! and 8 from 4,00-5,00 p.m. The youth of the church have planned numerous summer activities. They will meet every Sunday afternoon at 5,OO p.m. for recreation, at 6,00 p.m. for study and then refreshments at 7s15 p.m. Studies include four’sessions on “Death” led by the pastor, four sessions on “Christian and the Arts,” and in July three sessions on “Christian Vocations,” two sessions on “Personal Faiths” and will begin a series on “christian Social Concerns.” Service projects of the youth will include collecting items for hospitals, hospital visitation, and building a youth center. i Special recreation will include putt- putt golf, cook-out and hayride, roller skat- ing, horseback riding, bike hike and a fish- ing trip on Chesapeake Bay. /Sermon topics ares “Mary and Martha,” “Paralyzed Youth,” “Simon t~e Pharisee,” “Is Life Worth Living?” “Jesus, Pioneer of Life,” “Jesus, a Conformist?!’ and “Jesus, Disturber of the Peace.” We often ‘say “Christ is the answer” too quickly. It may be that Christ is really the question. God in Christ challenges us to open our lives, to grow and share, to inquire. We invite you to join with us as we seek God’s will for life. A NOTE OF THANKS Before the Richardsans and Vogts leave on their respective adventures, I would like to say from Cabin John “Thank You”. Burtt Richardson has put in 2 years and countless hours presiding over Cl~a Barton~PTA~ No one but a PTA president knows how many meetings, issues, and letters consune your life for a term of office. Thank you for answering our pleas and concerns, for caring about our children and the school that serves them. Thanks for Susan who ably assisted him while Juggling the editorship of the Village News and endless other chores. We sincerely hopeyou’ll enjoy your trips and will be back to fill up the vacant places we’re keeping warm. Diane Heflin 1/1/1/1////////////////////Hlll///// TRAINING FOR PARENTHOOD On Health Day in Cabin John, many people expressed interest in having a course geared to developing skills so that parents anf kids can communi- cate more effectively. To this pur- pose, the Adult Education Department of Montgomery County is able to offer a course called Family Communi- cation Skills if there id sufficient parent interest( 20 people or more). The course consists of lO 2 hour sessions that will meet once a week in the evening or daytime. The par- ents who signed up expressed an inter- est in Monday e~ening, but other times are also possible. The cost is $10 per person for I0 2 hour sessions. Classes will start in September. Details of using a local facility in Cabin John or Carderock can be worked out if there’is sufficient interest. For further information, call me i~Shirley Skoler, at 229-1130. Wayne Leaver, Pastor TAX RELIEF FOR THE ELDERLY TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE TO MEET Cabin John residents who are interested in meeting to share ideas and work out solutions to some of the transportation pro- blems (getting car pools together, providing home-bound persons with rides, cutting down on gasoline costs, etc.) are invited to attend a meeting at lock house IO on the Canal, Wednesday, the sixth of June at 7,30 p.m. RSVP at 229-3397, and I’ll plan 9n serving coffee. Under present Montgomery County tax relief programs, any homeowning taxpayer who is 65 or older or totally disabled is entitled to a property tax credit equal to the taxes due on the first $6,500 of their annual assessment if their income is $5,000 Or less not including social security or $1,200 of another pension. Proposed revisions to the program will raise to $6,500 the eligible income and to $1,800 other pension. ?????? ?????????????????????????????? . CRAB FEAST??? YES. VIRGINIA~ THERE WILL BE A CRAB FEAST THIS YEARI JULY 28 IS THE DATE TO MARK. MORE DETAILS IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE VILLAGE NEWS. II!!!II~!!IIIL!!~!!.,!!!!!!!!!!!!!!~! HIGHLIGHTING’CABIN JOHN 4 YEAR OLD cLASs The Cabin John 4 year old classwas started about I0 years ago byHome Study Inc., and has been in:0peration continually since. It was begun with the loveCabin Johners feel for all their children, on the theory that the childrenhere should have the same advantages Of children in the surrounding areas in order~to meet’on equal ground when they Join in jr. high and high school. The four year old class alone does not make the difference in educational advancement of the children, but it is a necessary positive step tow- ard that goal. ‘, ” B;ith Diane Heflin’s (the teacher’s) help for the past two years, the children have been building good self images while discovering the great things their minds and bodies cando. In addition to learn- ing the symbols of Communication, ABC and l, 2~3, they are introduced to school in an unstructured, fun atmosphere, best for four year olds. The children learn to express them- selves with a range of materials which are not generally avaliable to them in their homes. They learn to work together in skill or creative projects to achieve a g0al. This year the children have taken part in school assemblies for dramatic presentations, enjoyed visitors with a special talent or skill, taken part in cooking projects, and made trips to see a variety of workings of man a~d nature.; They arebeginning to develop interests of their own as a result of their activities~ The future of the four year old class is assured only to a certain degree. The Cabin John Citizens Association has formed a board of directors of the class to estab- lish guidelines for the class, maintain its financial stability, establish and maintain a working relationship between the class and the school administration, maintain its fin- ancial stability, to interview and hire a teacher and provide an aide, and to insure the continuance of the class each year. The board can only achieve its goals with the help of the parents and the citizenry of Cabin John. Some of the questions the board of directors of the calss will face and answer before the class opens in’the fall arel Will the board of directors in the interest of saving money, accept any0ther than the best trained, most highly educated teacher available? Jill they accept more children than the class size can rightfully support to insure that debts are paid, and that every Cabin John four year old will have this opportunity, or will it be necessary to look for a larger room? b hat is the future of the class is Clara Barton is closed? The board of directors is open to people who would like to help in solving these and other questions. Contact Diane Heflin. ~at the children may discover about themselves, if solutions are worked out, is that they have had the best advantage of all – being able at an earlyage to associate with and understand children from all ways of life. INSTRUMENTS NEEDED The Concord SchoOl, whose children have been stapeling the Village News for over a year, has a special re- quest to asM the families In this area. In order to keep allve ai -highlysuccessful year-long pilot program~ the school needs any and all used instruments. It was about a year’ago that Gib Muir, instrumental music teacher at Walter Johnson High School began to talk about his plan. There were about 12 or 13 Walter Johnson high- schoolers who wanted to help handi- capped kids learn the Joys of instru- mental musiC. Mr. Stanley Sincevich, principal of the Concord School, liked the idea~ and thought that his students, moderately retarded and trainable, would like it too. Together the two men got money from the school system for 15 to 18 instruments on a one-year rental basis, and the program was begun. Presently there are 22 delighted childrenat!~the Concord School( plus a long waiting list)who receiv~ one-to-one Instruction from dedicated Walter John§0n high schoolers. The rapport between “teacher” and “student’ is relaxed, supportive and spontaneous, The sense of achievement from the Concord children was:obvlous as I watche@ two violinists and a drummer concentrating on their music lessons. For themoderatelyretarded Child, playing an instrument teaches many %hinge llke hand-eye coordination, following directlons, lengthening attention span, auditory discrimln- ation, social skilland.group parti- clpation, self control, sense of rhythm~ and aesthetic values. With an instrument and a few tunes, a Cbhcord~child has a useful activity :for his order free time~ I : However, the county school money used this year is not available for next. Both the Concord children and !I; the Walter Johnson students are upset II ! at the prospect of an untimely end to such a successful program. The parents, faced with other necessary expenses, cannot buy new instruments. The only soiutlon seems to be for Concord to collect its own “store” of used instruments. If you or anyone you”kn0~ has an old instrument (the condition is not !mportant if it can be repaired), its ~donation to the Conc6rd School would ~ibe of great help. Anykind of instru- !ment is acceptable. Of course, all instruments lwould become the property of Concord ~chool. If you don’t have an instrument and would still like to help, ~ a8fund is being set up to help rent ( to ~9 per month) or buy instrumented. Checks shouldbe made out to Concord School Instrumental FUnd, and sent to the Concord School 7210 Hidd~n Creek Rd. Bethesda, Md. ~’ Mr. Sincevich hopes that this program might be extended to other schools of moderately retarded ‘since ithas done so well at Concord. For further information or to donate an instrument, cal ! him at the school- 229-6111. ~- Thursday. May 24. 1973 Montgomery ..Co~,q,, Hal. SENTINEl- Move: Over, i Georgetown; “d Step Ast e, -.- … .- IWELDING A ‘SCULPTUR~named “V.eron’ica”and made in part of Volkswago  plect~.is.Cabin John artist Maria Wishner. . ‘ I. enl Sausalito …. ,. . %’.’| / By Ed Wasserman i ” • Sentinel Reporter With Georgetown increasingly overrun with restau~ rants, boutiques and shoppers, metropolitan Washing- ton’s center of activities in the vistJal arts and crafts now may/ be shifting to the quiet areas of Glen Echo and Cabin John along the banks of the Potomac. ‘ Although Capitol Hill andOi’~! Towne Alexandria have c!aimed their share of artist-~efugees from Wash- ington s cohgested M0ntmartre off ! M Street, the tree- lined Stretches on MacArthur Boulevard seem to bebe- coming the hottest artistic locale around. • “-/ “This area may be in the process of becoming an- other Sausalito or Provincetown,” says photographer Shirley• Trebach, proprietress of the newly-opened.Ar- tisans’ Gallery in Cabin’John. Artisans il~ housed:in.a wooden frame house, “parts” of which are 50-years-old, ‘that formerly had served as a post ,office, grocerystore and an antique shop where. Bess Tr~an..andmemb©rs of her husband’s cabinet’!i’.are:~.said”t(. . .~,’~i~aq’eqdib pPdd/.!i.:\~¢ .. f gallery. offers a wide.-i~ange-‘of arts”and’:6riifts;!..rangin~g..: from Motas embroideries from the’San;::Blas ~.slandS 1~0..::: tee work of DX~. arealgrintmakers, and including, oils”, ,” scUipfdres acrylics, bas relief and flee-standing ‘ anal nu: ” , merous curios. , / Despite an apparent lack of focus that makes an art I colony out of an area of residential retreat, Mrs. Tre- b~ach is optimistic about Cabin :John/Glen-Echo’s artis- tic {uture. “It’s surprising to me how many artists there are in this area,” she says. But the direction in which the scene will move–on whether it will move at all–are ques- tions still very much up in the air..- • Connie Bergfors is a.color painter of the “Washing- ton :School” who works on canvas and paper with.acryl- ics. ,Educated at Smith, the Corcoran and ltaly’s:Ac, cademia di BoNe Arte, she has displayed her work on three conti’nents, and is currently !dlr~.’tor..of the!Cabin John Visual Studtcs.Worksh p ~., .:. ~.~..-~ • ;~ .~.:~.. Miss Bergfors worlds in a studio tn :the Cab~ John home where she and .her husband have lived since 1965, on heavily wooded land just up from a !mansion built in 1835. “This is such a lovely area,” she says, “the place . whe’re you’d dome from D.C. j¢st to cool off.” The re- gion is racially-integrated she notes with Blacks, Latins, East Asians and even some Arabs moving in to give the formerly rural stretch cosmopolitan flavor. “The area is getting irrtellectually livelier, for what that’sworth,” she observes, adding: “If.we can hold off the big buildings andiup-zoning, this would be a logical place for some- thing like an art colony to really grow. There’s space, physical beauty and low rents. :i” ” ‘ The prospects of an arts/renalssance In Washin~’6.n.,”:;::’./ would also seem favo~l”by the Very’ lack’ ~ofail’-~iir{i~tic “i …. establishment in the area, a~co’rding to Miss .B~gfors~ . ” “There’s no hardened itifrastriict’ur¢~-no established Set of people that would have,tobedisplaced by those trying t0.get ahead,” she observes. The transience of’the metrOf~olitan populace and its / . lack of background in the arts are also. factors thatl make”./ ” Washington less than ideal as an arts ¢~ter. “When I : ! lived in Chicago, people seemed to be making a consci.- ‘i ! entious effort to have one o’,r two pieces of.local art t6::trY i~!. ~ to support the local artists,’ commentsMaria Wishn¢/, : ‘ ! Czech-born multimedia seulptress.’Trai/icd at::/tbe’Sor- -, bonne, Chicago Art InstitUte and:American Unigersity, / Mrs. Wishner comes from a family of-artists that in- / c!udes an unclewho studied with Rodin and was the fi~t”./ “Washing, to 0 is a city where people strive ‘for and; hold status, is tqi’ms of mon~ and .tmwer,”she remarks, sitting in-.the li~ing roo:m~o’f~h~6r:~!.smali~.home.in Cabin! JohniGai’ddas. i:~’Th~yl;’don’t ~e6~i~fdh~a~e ihe interest to’ get ~ beyond’:the ~literai in their art,t~tcs: people always/ ask~.~at.i~is.it?~wh~ in~ fact the. d0~a. tl~ave the patience. or~,b~i~und/to tt~to un’de.~ta0d it~”.!~d~sposifi0n and : !=,m.o~m. ent: Of mass through Spa6~th’~f:’~i~.theisoul of is”‘~”~Jch.-of the hopes for an artistic blossoming in the Glen Ech0/Cabin John region seems to center on Glen Echo Park. There, Park Service personnel and artists and c~ftsmen * are striving to bring Glen Echo around ,’ the full circle–back to.the concept of the Chautauqua cultural arts center that occupied the grounds before the now defunctamusement park …. The possibility of a comprehensive center for experimentation and instruction ,. in all manner of art, theater, music, craft– I, .not to mention human developmeni and ~…ecological responsibility=-is appealing one i:., to the area’s artists.. Entering its second sea- ,., .’son, the park offers low-priced courses in such things as animal sculpture, yoga, wa- . tereblor and drawings, photography, group theater, natural foods, music appreciation and automotive awareness. For participa- ting artists, the park offers a place where they can display their work and earn money ‘ through instruction. What it does not yet offer–and what ;’ ” many feel is its most important artistic mis- ‘ sion–is a place for artists to come together and learn from one another. “‘They’re scared,” says Miss Bergfors. “It’s a gov- . i ~t ernment project, and they’re worried about ‘ seeming eliti’st. What they have to see is that , , developing advanced ideas in art doesn’t have’to be an elitist or esoter c thing.” HIGHLIGHTING-CABIN JOHN 4 YEAR OLD CLASS The Cabin John 4 year old class was started about I0 years= ago by Home Study Inc., and has been in operation continually since. It was begun with the ilove Cabin Johners feel for all their children, on the theory that the children here should have the same advantages of children in the surrounding areas in order to meet on equal ground when they Join in jr. high and high school. The four year old class alone does not make the difference in educational advancement of the children, but it is a necessary positive step tow- ard that goal. ~ith Diane Heflin’s (the teacher’s) help for the past two years, the children have been building good self images while discovering the greatthings their minds and bodies can do. In addition to learn- ing the symbols of communication, ABC and l, 2, 3, they are introduced to school in an unstructured, fun atmosphere, best for ~ four year olds 0 The children learn to express them- selves with a range of materials which are not generally available to them in their homes. • They learn to work together in skill or creative projects to achieve a goal. This year the children have taken part in school assemblies for dramatic presentations, enjoyed visitors with a special talent or skill, taken part in cooking projects, and made trips to see a variety of workings of man and nature. They are beginning to develop interests of their own as a result of their activities. The future of the four year old class is assured only to a Certain degree. The Cabin John Citizens Association has formed a board of directors of the class to estab- lish guidelines for the class, maintain its financial Stability, establish and maintain a working relationship between the class and the school administration, maintain its fin- ancial stability, to interview and hire a teacher and provide an aide, and to insure the continuance of the class each year. The board can only achieve its goals with the help of the parents and the citizenry of Cabin John. Some of the questions the board of directors of the calss will face and answer before the class opens in the fall ares Will the board of directors in the interest of saving money, accept any other than the best trained, most highly educated teacher ava ilabl e ? \ Vill they accept more children than the class size can rightfully support to insure that debts are paid, and that every Cabin John four year old will have this opportunity, or will it be necessary to look for a larger room? b hat is the future of the class is Clara Barton is closed? The board of directors is open to people who would like to help in solving these and other questions. Contact Diane Heflin. ~hat the children may discover about themselves, if solutions are worked out, is that they have had the best advantage of all – being able at an early age to associate with and understand children from all ways of life. INSTRUMENTS NEEDED !r II f i I The Concord School, whose children have been stapeling the Village News for over a year, has a speciaI re- quest to ask the families in this area. In order to keep alive highly successful year-long pilot program, the school needs any land all used instruments, It was about a year ago that Gib Muir, instrumental music teacher at Walter Johnson High School began to talk about his plan. There ~ere about 12 orl3 Walter Johnson high- schoolers who wanted to help handi- capped kids learn the Joys of instru- mental music. Mr. Stanley Sincevich, principal of the Concord School, liked the idea, and thought that his students, moderately retarded and trainable, would like it too. Together the two men got money from the school system for l~ to 18 instruments on a one-year rental basis, and the program was begun. Presently there are 22 delighted children at the Concord School( plus a long waiting list) who receive one-to-one instruction from dedicated Walter Johnson high schoolers. The rapport between””teacher” and “student is relaxed, supportive and spontaneous The sense of achievement from the Concord children was obvious as I watched tw~iviolinists and a dzummer concentrating on their music lelssons For the ~oderately retarded child~ playing an instrument teaches many things llke hand-eye coordination, following directions, lengthening attention span, auditory discrimin- ation, social skill and group p~rti- cipation~ self control, sense o~ rhythm, and aesthetic values. W~th an instrument and a few tunes, a Con#~rdchildhas a useful actiyity for his or her free time. However~ the county school money used this year is not available for next. Both the Concord childre~ and the Walter Johnson students are upset at the prospect of an untimely end to such a successful program. The parents, faced with ot~er necesisary expenses, cannot buy new instruments. The only solution seems to be for Concord to collect its own “store” of • used inst rument s. If you or anyone you know has an old instrument (the condition is not ilmportant if it can be repaired), its donation to the Concord School would ~ibe of great help. Any kind of instru- !ment is acceptable. Of course, all instruments would become the property of Concord ~chool. If you don’t have an instrument • . and would still like to help, a fund is being set up to help rent (~8 to ~9 per month) or buy instruments. Checks should be made out to Concord School Instrumental Fund, and sent to the Concqrd School 7210 Hidden Creek Rd. B~hesda, Md. ! Mr. Sincevich hopes that this program might be extended to other school.s of moderately retarded ~since it has done so well at Concord. i! For further information or to donate an instrument, ~ call him at the ~chool- 229-6111. Montgomery r,ursa~v, u~v 24. ~S73 . Cou,tr. Md. SENTINEL i Move Over,) Georgetown; Step Aside, i , ~ . ,. IWELDINGA ‘SCULPTUR~’r!named “Veron!ca”and made in part of Volkswal “plec~is Cabla John artist Maria”Wishner. i%:. 7.- :”. ” ~,) ~,,’:,’5. :’5; ~ ‘ ! I ,,,.!,~2%l~.-~/~:,.’~ ,~ .,, ~,.. :r,L’ .*. ‘ ,’~ {.~’~:~4 . ” 7 ? Sausalito ‘ ~’~ i’ ¸ By Ed Wasserman , Sentinel Reporte~ With Georgetown increasingly ~ overrun with restau- rants, boutiques and shoppers, metropolitan Washing- ton’s center of activities in the visttal ars and crafts now may be shifting tothe quiet areas of Glen Echo and Cabin John along the banks of the Potorfiac. ‘ Although Capitol Hill andOld Towne Alexandi’ia have claimed their share of artist-refugees from Wash- ington’s cohgested Montmartre on M Street, the tree- lined Stretches on MacArthur Boulevard. soem to bebe- coming the hottestartistic iocalearound. “-. “‘This area may be in the process of becoming an- other.Sausalito or Provincetown,” says photographer Shirley Trebach, proprietress of the newly-opened,Ar- tisans’ Gallery in Cabin:John. Artisans il; housedin.a wooden frame, house, “parts” of which are 50-years,old, that formerly had served as a post,office, grocery store and an antique shop.where. Bess Trffihan’: and members of her husband’s cabin6t~are~said”t¢I~i~a~i~flibl~P~:l~’!’~¢ gallery 0ffers a wide .i’ange-:of.~irts alid!,i~f~ifts;,:rhngiijg. ‘/ from Motas embroideries. from the San/Blas~.ila~ds ~ ¢0:; ~ tlie work of DXL area l~rintmakers; and4ndttdin~ oilg; ‘- acrylics, has fdief and flee-standing sculpfilres anal nu: :’ mei’ous curios. . , ‘Despite an apparent lack of focus that makes an art i colony out of an area of residential retreat, Mrs. Tre- bach is optimistic about Cabin3ohn/Gier~Echo’s artis- tic future. “It’s surprising to me how many artists there are~in this area,” she says. But the direction in which the scene will move–on whether it will move at all–are ques- ” tions still very much up in the air. – , “Washington is a city where people strive ‘for and hold status, ~s t~ms of mon~ and ~wer, :she remarks, ‘ Connie Bergfors is a.coior painter of the “Washing- ” ” ~ ” ” ” ‘ tonlSchool’ who works on canvas and paper with,acryl- • sitting in;the::li~ingrgo:m:!o’~f~.g~a|i~hOm~in Cabin! ics.iEducated at Smifh,.the Corcoran and Italy S: Ac, . ~Johff;~G~ii’d~S.t:~’Th¢~,)d0n’t seo~i~to”h:/~d the interest to ! cad~mia di BoNe Arte, she has displayed her work on get~.b~ond’theiliteral in theirart~tastc~:i people always ~ three continents, and is currently~dlr~to!..otheCabin i asks’W1 at~:is.it?twhcn in,fact th~!don’t~h~vethevatience .. John Visual Studies:.W~orl(‘ghop..~:~.: : :~ ;~’~i,!: . ….. .:. . ‘ 1 ot,:!~b’~ic~ound/t0: tryto und¢igta~dt~ii~sposi/,10n and Mtss Bergfors worlds …. m’ a studm:in .the! …. “Cabm'” John ,~ i:. ” ~o~em’cnt’:0fmass, through ‘spii~¢;th’~g!.”:ig- theisoul of husU?bupndroh~V: l~:ds~nc~di~t~n / < sculm”u,”F, • ” – • • • ~ i • • • :! ho° r~eea~ihi;rew ~ho~:dn fa hn~r J I: giuch of the hopes for an artistic blossoming in the ,, • • ‘; – ~ I Glen Ech0/Cabin John region seems to center on Glen 1835. Thts ts such a lovely area, she says, the place : where you’d come from D.C. jcst~to ‘ cool off.” The re-! i Echo Park. There, Park Service personnel and artists gion is racially-integrated she notes with Blacks, Latins, . and craftsmen are striving to bring Glen Echo around East Asians and even some Arabs moving in to give the formerly rural stretch cosmopolitan flavor. “The area is …. ‘ ‘W ” C gettmg trrteilectually hveher, for what that s orth, sh observes, adding: “If we can hold off the big buildings” and up-zoning, this would be a logical place for some- thing like an art colony to really grow. There’s space, physicalbeauty andl0 w rents.” .__ ….. . ~ .!~:.. The prospects of an arts~renaissance in Washln~n- 7″., would also seem favo~&l by the:~’ery.lack.~)f:a~l’:~i~t’~iC “. :; establishment in the area,, a~c0~ding to Miss. B~gfor~s~ “There S no hardened irifraStruCtur¢;.no established *~et , of people that would haveto bodisplaced by those trying to.get ahead,” she observes, The transience of’the.mc~ropoiitan ~pui~ice andits  . lack ofbackgr0und in the arts ~ire also..factorsthat make ~ I ‘ Washington less than ideal asan arts c~ter. “When I ~, lived in Chicago, people seemed to be making a cansci- .i’ !’. • entious effort to have one oi” two pieces of.local ar~ tf!’try ‘:i! . / to support thelocal artists,, comments”.Mafia.Wjshn~, ~ ‘ ~ ! Czech-born multimedia sculptress.’ Train~! ~t;i-t~¢ Sol -, . bonne, Chicago Art InstitUte and:American Unigersi.ty, / Mrs., Wishner comes from a family of artists, that’ in- i ‘ eludes an uncle who studied with Rodin.and was the fihR”t / the full circle–back to the concept of the Chautauqua i cultural arts center that occupied the grounds before the now defunctamusement park …. The possibility of a comprehensive center for experimentation and instr, uction in all manner of art, theater, music, craft– ‘not to mention human development and ~: -ecological: rcsponsibility:-is appealing one : to the area’s artists. Entering its second sea. • :son, the park offers low-priced courses in such things as animal sculpture, yoga, wa- tercolor and drawings, photography, group theater, natural foods, music appreciation and automotive awareness• For pariicipa- ting artists, the park offers a place where ~ they can display their work and earn money : through instruction. – .. .~ .. What it does not yet offer–and what , – many feel is its most important artistic mis- • sion–is a place for artists to come together and learn from one another• “They’re scared,” says Miss Bergfors. “‘It’s a gov- ~! . ernment project, and they’re worried about ,. s~ming’elitist. What they have to see is that , developing advanced ideas in art doesn’t have’to be an elitjst or esoteric thing.” / SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAMS FOR CABIN JOHN YOUTH Beginning Monday June 25, the Cabin John Recreation Center will be opened as a summer playground site. The center will be open from l p.m ~. to’ 4 p.m. Monday through Frid~. The playground program will be conducted for a seven week period and will end August i0. A variety of program activities have been planned including swimming and cm~ping trips, athletic leagues , crafts and low-organized games. The major emphasis of these programs is for children in grades kindergarten through six. Junior and senior high youth are invited to participate in a program specifically designed for this age group, which will meet every Monday,Tuesday, and Thursday between the hours of 6:3Op.m. and 8:30 p.m. at Thomas W. P~le Jr. High School. If you have any questions regarding the summer playground program call Rick Robinson at OL2-2249. .. LITTLE FALLS LIBRARY NOTES On June 13 there will be a talk and demonstration of pressing flowers in the upstairs library from 3 to 5 p.m. There will be a story hour on June 2 atlO~30 a.m. The %~itman Dramatic Club will present the Story of the Reluctant Dragon on the 5th and the 7th of June at 4 p.m. On June 6 the ” Relative Minors” will present a concert at the library at 7:30 p.mo !1/{I//I//11////II/I)////////////11/ P.S. TO THE TOTORO CHAPEL STORY { After last month’s paper had gone to press, I discovered another part which Morris Fradin had written to go with his “Smallest Chapel” story. Under the assumption that better late than never, I’m including it here. The Totoros are the couple who own the chapel and the land around it. Annice’Totoro was born in Martin, Tenn, graduated from the University of Tennessee and taught school in that state. She was the first woman president of the Cabin John Park Citizens’ Asso. serving with distinction from 1957 (half term of Ralph Fleischman) through 1959. She retired from the Taylor Model Basin in 1963. Lorenzo Totoro, born in Messina, Italy, lived in D.C. most of his life before coming with Annice to Cabin John in 1944, Inhis youth, Lorenzo was a prizefighter and was well known under the name of”Jack Renzo”. He was once hired to be the sparring partner of Jack Dempsey, heaveyweightchampion of the world, but is happy tha__~t engage- ment ~as cancelled. However, Lorenzo has ofter been mistaken bzold time fans for Dempsey, whomhe resembles. e retired from the Taylor Model Basin n 1957. HOME STUDY INC. , %,~?LAT IS IT? Home Study began in Ken Gar Maryland in 1960 to lessen the gap between black and white children in Kensington schools integrated only a few years earlier. Some of the projects of homestudy are: study sessions in the home; in-school tutoring| pre-schools| • infant education program~ enrichment activities, both creative and recreational; summer camp experiences| teen projectsl and adult study sessions. Cabin John Home Study has concerned itself with a~l Cabin John children, and has contributed heavily to the four year old class, and to sending Cabin John children to camp. The Home Study Program needs the help of anyone concerned about children to work as volunteer tutors, nursery aides, drivers, fund raisers, recreation ~ directors, advisors, • and committee members. ; To volunteer call Mrs. Celeste Swedenberg – 229-2282. 11″77″lt’#~-tl~l’~’~l I~ it.. I~ d tl’~i-B ~-7~7″7~C?Trlt’7,~’77-h’, 7i ~71~ ~” ~ ?t CITIZENS ASSOCIATION ELECTS NEW 0FFICE~,, ~ The slate of officers which was pre- sented to the Citizens Association onMay 17 is as follows, President – Rita Kelly Ist Vice President- Minda Vetzel 2nd Vice President – Bill White Treasurer – Jim Plumb Corresponding Secretary- Barbara Clark Recording Secretary – George Deihl The slate was elected unanimously with no revisions. Rita Kelly is hopeful that the implementation of the Cabin John Plan can be achieved in the coming year. She invites the community to participate and support the executive committee and the Association in gaining the goals of the plan. To Ed Winslow and other officers of last year -thank you – for your work in writing the plan in accordance with • the wishes and desires • Of the communityl VFW PLANS INSTALLATION OF OFFICEP~S Officers to be installed in ceremony on the 2nd of June are as follows: i Commander -Mike Koslovski ! St, Vice Commander – R. B. Jones Jr. Vice Commander – Stan Holifield Quartermaster – Alvin Lynch Advocate Ed Conley Surgeon – Rusty Slaton Chaplain – Ralph Morgal 3 Year Trustee – Archie Booth i Officers to Be installed for the ~:omen’s Auxiliary of the V~ are as follows, President Irene Fortner St. Vice President – Dorothy Holifield Jr. Vice President – HelenMacalush Chaplain – Dorothy Kuster Conductress – Francis Hugueley Treasurer – Sharon Kling Guard – Ann Cittadino Year T~ustee – Ruby Schell WANT ADS LAUNS CUT, Andy Clark, calI~:229-6431. I have my own mower. IRO~,Ih~ IN YOUR HOME~ Will deliver and pick up in Cabin John. Call 656-6650 or 656 6632. FOUND, ~mile 3/4 grown grey tiger cat. Very affectionate. 229-8146. ~ANTED~ Experienced hairdresser. Call 229-1361 or 229-9811. BABYSITTING, HOUS~OLD CHORES Call Heidi Heflin – 229-0280. Bus-Camper: ’59, 56 passanger bus, Oneida Body, rebuilt engine, converted into motor home. Sleeps six, full kitchen, shower, john, wired l15v AC and 12v DC, ~ully equipped. To highest Bidder. 229-8598 BOOKMOBILE COMES TO QUICK FOOD. SHOP During summer, the bookmobile will be at the Quick Food Shop every Monday from 5 – 5130 pmo If you want a certain book , you can order it, and it will be brough t to you the following week, if available. Enjoy reading this summer. VILLAGE NEWS STAFF MaryAnn Wilson~ Editor 229-3397 Susan Vogt. Asso. Editor 229-6479 RECIPE LADIES FILE ()(.)()()()()()()()()()() Want ads cost 50¢. Commercial ads cost $3 per month or $8/ 3 mos.i Mailing subscription ~2 per year *************************** WHOLE WHEAT HREAD (Kay Kemp! 2 cakes or packs of yeast ‘t’c. lukewarm water 4 c. milk (reconstituted powdered milk is excellent) I T. salt I T. s~gar 7-9 c. whole wheat flour Dissolve yeast in water. Heat milk to lukewarm! add yeast, salt, and sugar, Stir in 3~ cups flour and blend well. Add enough of remaining flour to make a stiff dough. Knead on a floured board • until smooth. Place in a bowl, cover, and let raise i hour. Shape into 2 loaves and place in greased loaf pans. Let raise 15 minutes. Bake at 350 degrees for I hour. Brush with butter. II QU|  POOl) 5HOP I,+’.~~ – fo e,~ ~.,,,~. ‘u, ~,,r,-o,k,h, st, An,I,’,.,+,, EMIw DOLE ZAL. Morris Fradin~ Articles 229-1338 ” 14E  ast. , . IN@ 22o -8789 ,.,n.,,,.,,,,,. I 2z 9 .:i- II u~t=.~~l I .~ut~satON I / “1,0, II1~~’1″~ It. i/ 0,’~., ~’~1 .’ Cdlb ~. I~L IIRn I There’s a report being circulated around which Eric Buchman compiled on the problem of low-flying aircraft in Cabin John. Mr Buchman is a con- sultant in Acoustical and Vibration Engineering, and is quite concerned about noise and air pollution from National Airport planes. If anyone is interested in this problem too, call Eric Buchman 229-5127 or the Public Services Chairman, ~alvln Kytle 22q- 6609. ()()(•)( )( )( )( )( 3()( )( )( )( )( )( )C )( )( ) ()()()()()()()()()()(3(3(3(3()()() ) The I Village News needs a new delivelrer for about 70 houses – pay, ~1.40 per month. The houses are on! 79th St., 79th P1. and 80th St. north of MacArthur. Plus the housesi with mai!box~ on the no~:th side of MacArthur and the Carol Richard Apartments. Please call Susan Vogt. 229-6479 () ( )( )i )() ( )( )( )(~ () ( 3( )( :)~( ) () ( )( )( ) t ‘ l I ‘J I I : i  / ! ~Z ‘ v / , ,’ Z ,’ t ‘ ~’ LL Our sympathies to all the Smith family onthe death of BeBe last month. He left many friends. . . _a% I : Z i ‘ -~. . • JZ i We need more recipes! Please send , your favorite to Mary A~ Wilson P.O. Box 186, Cabin •John, Md. 20731 **************************************** ……. **************************************** The attached flyer was given to me by a resident of Cabin John who is concerned about the dog problem.ln Cabin John. IIIIIIIII!/!!111111111111111111111111111 …. – Personal: Barnaby to Lucy Irm sorry – We ca_._nn live together in the back of the van. How’s your tic? Meet me at the farm. &&&&&~&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

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